Thai National Parks

Birds of Thailand

Species of Thailand

Small buttonquail

Thai: นกคุ่มอืดเล็ก, nok khum eud lek

Binomial name: Turnix sylvaticus, Rene Louiche Desfontaines, 1789

The common buttonquail, Kurrichane buttonquail, small buttonquail, or Andalusian hemipode (Turnix sylvaticus) is a buttonquail, one of a small family of birds which resemble, but are unrelated to, the true quails. This species is resident from southern Spain and Africa through India and tropical Asia to Indonesia.

This tiny buttonquail is notoriously difficult to see. It is a small, long drab running bird, which avoids flying. It inhabits warm grasslands or scrub jungle and feeds on insects and seeds. This species avoids thick forest and hilly country, and lives by preference in cornfields and stretches of grassy plain though it may also be found in any type of low herbage and open scrub jungle. It skulks and is flushed with difficulty, rising often close by one's feet. When flushed it flies low over the ground and soon settles again, after which it is very difficult to put up a second time.

The common buttonquail resemble the common quail. It has streaked sandy brown upperparts, buff underparts with black flank markings, and a plain face. In flight, a whitish wingbar contrasts with the grey wing. Sexes are similar, but immature birds are more spotted below.

The female initiates courtship and builds the ground nest. The male incubates the normally four speckled greyish eggs, and tends the young, which can run as soon as they are hatched. The nesting season is June to September. The nest is a slight pad of grass placed in a natural hollow in the ground where it is usually tucked away amongst the stems of a tuft of grass. Very occasionally the grass is bent over it in a sort of canopy.

The female calls with a deep hoom-hoom-hoom and the male replies kek-kek-kek.

Widespread throughout its large range, the small buttonquail is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

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Scientific classification

Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Turniciformes
Family
Turnicidae
Genus
Turnix
Species
Turnix sylvaticus

Common names

  • English:
    • Andalusian hemipode
    • Common buttonquail
    • Kurrichane buttonquail
  • French: Turnix d'andalousie
  • Thai: นกคุ่มอืดเล็ก, nok khum eud lek

Synonyms

  • Turnix sylvatica, BirdLife International (2004)
  • Turnix sylvatica, Robert J. Dowsett & Alexander David Forbes-Watson (1993)
  • Turnix sylvatica, Charles Gald Sibley & Burt Leavelle Monroe (1990)
  • Turnix sylvatica, S. Cramp & K. E. L. Simmons (1977)

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN3.1)

Least Concern (IUCN3.1)

Turnix sylvatica

Turnix sylvatica

Public domain

Distribution map of Small buttonquail, Turnix sylvaticus in Thailand
  • Bang Phra Non-hunting Area
  • Kaeng Krachan National Park
  • Kamphaeng Saen District, Nakhon Pathom
  • Khao Yai National Park
  • Khao Yoi District, Phetchaburi
  • Mae Ai District, Chiang Mai
  • Mae Rim District, Chiang Mai
  • Mueang Ratchaburi District, Ratchaburi
  • Pak Chong District, Nakhon Ratchasima

Range map of Turnix sylvaticus in Thailand

Important note; our range maps are based on limited data we have collected. The data is not necessarily accurate or complete.

Special thanks to Ton Smits, Parinya Pawangkhanant, Ian Dugdale and many others for their contribution for range data.

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