Thai National Parks

Birds of Thailand

Species of Thailand

Siamese fireback

Binomial name: Lophura diardi, Charles Lucien Bonaparte, 1856

The Siamese fireback (Lophura diardi) also known as Diard's fireback is a fairly large, approximately 80 cm long, pheasant. The male has a grey plumage with an extensive red facial skin, crimson legs and feet, ornamental black crest feathers, reddish brown iris and long curved blackish tail. The female is a brown bird with blackish wing and tail feathers.

The Siamese fireback is distributed to the lowland and evergreen forests of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam in Southeast Asia. This species is also designated as the national bird of Thailand. The female usually lays between four to eight rosy eggs.

The scientific name commemorates the French naturalist Pierre-Médard Diard.

Status

Due to habitat loss and over-hunting in some areas, the Siamese fireback was evaluated as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List, however, it is now Least Concern, because the populations declines were probably overestimated a lot.

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Scientific classification

Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Galliformes
Family
Phasianidae
Genus
Lophura
Species
Lophura diardi

Common names

  • English:
    • Diard's fireback
    • Siamese fireback

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN3.1)

Least Concern (IUCN3.1)

Siamese fireback (Khao Yai National Park)

Siamese fireback (Khao Yai National Park)

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Range map of Lophura diardi in Thailand

Important note; our range maps are based on limited data we have collected. The data is not necessarily accurate or complete.

Special thanks to Ton Smits and Parinya Pawangkhanant for their help with many range data.

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