Thai National Parks

Birds of Thailand

Species of Thailand

Japanese tit

Binomial name: Parus minor, Coenraad Jacob Temminck & Hermann Schlegel, 1848

The Japanese tit (Parus minor), also known as the Oriental tit, is a passerine bird which replaces the similar great tit in Japan and the Russian Far East beyond the Amur River, including the Kuril Islands. Until recently, this species was classified as a subspecies of great tit (Parus major), but studies indicated that the two species coexist in the Russian Far East without intermingling or frequent hybridization.

The species made headlines in March 2016, when Suzuki et al. reported in Nature Communications that they had found experimental evidence for compositional syntax in bird calls, marking the first such evidence for that type of syntax in nonhuman animals.

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Scientific classification

Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Passeriformes
Family
Paridae
Genus
Parus
Species
Parus minor
Distribution map of Japanese tit, Parus minor in Thailand
  • Chiang Dao Wildlife Sanctuary
  • Doi Inthanon National Park
  • Doi Pha Hom Pok National Park
  • Doi Suthep-Pui National Park
  • Huai Nam Dang National Park
  • Khun Chae National Park
  • Mae Rim District, Chiang Mai
  • Mueang Chiang Mai District, Chiang Mai
  • Pang Tong Royal Forest Park
  • Pha Daeng National Park

Range map of Parus minor in Thailand

Important note; our range maps are based on limited data we have collected. The data is not necessarily accurate or complete.

Special thanks to Ton Smits, Parinya Pawangkhanant, Ian Dugdale and many others for their contribution for range data.

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